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Inter VLAN Routing Configuration

on Packet Tracer (Router on Stick)




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VLANs are the virtual LANS that provide divide your big network, into smaller pieces. Many companies use to divide their networks into different departments. We have discussed the basic logic of VLANs in the previous articles.

As you know each VLAN is a seperate VLAN. Each of them is a single network. So at the beginning, there is no communication between VLAN. To enable the communication of these different sub networks, we need Inter VLAN Routing. In other words, this topology called “Router on Stick” topology. Inter VLAN Routing topology or Router on Stick topology is a very common topology for CCNA exams.

You can DOWNLOAD the Packet Tracer example with .pkt format HERE.

In this article, we will use the below Router on Stick topology and we will configure Inter VLAN Routing on Packet Tracer.

router on stick topology, inter VLAN routing

Router on Stick Topology

Router on Stick (Inter VLAN Routing) topology basically consist of one switch and a router. Here, the switch is the place that our VLANs exist and the router is the device that route the traffic.

For Router on Stick topology (Inter VLAN Routing) configuration, we will create router virtual interfaces under the router interfaces. Then, we will assign each of this virtual interface to a specific VLAN. We will also create our VLANs and configure the PCs on that VLAN. For Router on Stick topology (Inter VLAN Routing), we will use one switch, one router and six PCs in Packet Tracer. And we will have 3 VLANs.

Let’s start to configure our Router on Stick topology (Inter VLAN Routing).

We will use 10.0.0.0/24, 20.0.0.0/24 and 30.0.0.0/24 blocks for our Packet Tracer Router on Stick topology example. The first block will be for VLAN 2, the second will be for VLAN 3 and the last one will be for VLAN 4.

Firstly, we ll configure the IP addresses of the PCs on Packet Tracer like below.

PC0 :  10.0.0.2	255.255.255.0
GW : 10.0.0.1

PC1 :  10.0.0.3	255.255.255.0
GW : 10.0.0.1

PC2 :  20.0.0.2	255.255.255.0
GW : 20.0.0.1

PC3 :  20.0.0.3	255.255.255.0
GW : 20.0.0.1

PC4 :  30.0.0.2	255.255.255.0
GW : 30.0.0.1

PC5 :  30.0.0.3	255.255.255.0
GW : 30.0.0.1

Here, the gateway addresses of the PCs will be the IP address of router virtual interfaces. Each router virtual interface will have an IP addresses as gateway of one of the VLANs.

Now, let’s configure our VLANs and assign the interfaces to these VLANs. Firstly we will create VLAN 2,3 and 4. Then, we will enter the interface range and configure the interface range as access interface. Lastly, we will assign the interface to a specific VLAN with “switchport access vlan” command.

Switch (config) # vlan 2
Switch (config-vlan) # vlan 3
Switch (config-vlan) # vlan 4
Switch (config-vlan) # exit
Switch (config) # interface range fastEthernet 0/2-3
Switch (config-if-range) # switchport mode access
Switch (config-if-range) # switchport access vlan 2
Switch (config-if-range) #exit
Switch (config) # interface range fastEthernet 0/4-5
Switch (config-if-range) # switchport mode access
Switch (config-if-range) # switchport access vlan 3
Switch (config-if-range) #exit
Switch (config) # interface range fastEthernet 0/6-7
Switch (config-if-range) # switchport mode access
Switch (config-if-range) # switchport access vlan 4
Switch (config-if-range) #exit

Our VLAN configurations are OK on the switch now. Let’s verify the VLANs.

Switch#   show vlan

VLAN Name                             Status    Ports
---- -------------------------------- --------- -------------------------------
1    default                          active    Fa0/8, Fa0/9, Fa0/10, Fa0/11
                                                Fa0/12, Fa0/13, Fa0/14, Fa0/15
                                                Fa0/16, Fa0/17, Fa0/18, Fa0/19
                                                Fa0/20, Fa0/21, Fa0/22, Fa0/23
                                                Fa0/24, Gig0/1, Gig0/2
2    VLAN0002                         active    Fa0/2, Fa0/3
3    VLAN0003                         active    Fa0/4, Fa0/5
4    VLAN0004                         active    Fa0/6, Fa0/7
1002 fddi-default                     act/unsup 
1003 token-ring-default               act/unsup 
1004 fddinet-default                  act/unsup 
1005 trnet-default                    act/unsup 

AN Type  SAID       MTU   Parent RingNo BridgeNo Stp  BrdgMode Trans1 Trans2
---- ----- ---------- ----- ------ ------ -------- ---- -------- ------ ------
1    enet  100001     1500  -      -      -        -    -        0      0
2    enet  100002     1500  -      -      -        -    -        0      0
3    enet  100003     1500  -      -      -        -    -        0      0
4    enet  100004     1500  -      -      -        -    -        0      0

As you can see, for our Router on Stick topology, Interface Fa0/2 and Fa0/3 are the member of VLAN 2, Interface Fa0/4 and Fa0/5 are the member of VLAN 3, Interface Fa0/6 and Fa0/7 are the member of VLAN 4. Interface Fa0/1 is not on the VLAN table. Because it is our Trunking port.

It is time to configure the switch’s router face interface, interface 0/1. We will connect switch to the router, with this interface. This interface will be a trunk port. In our Router on Stick topology, Trunk interface will pass all our VLANs that we allowed.

Switch (config) # interface fastEthernet 0/1
Switch (config-if) # switchport mode trunk
Switch (config-if) # switchport trunk allowed vlan 2,3,4
Switch (config-if) #exit

Our switch configuration is ok, on Packet Tracer. We can configure the router, Router on Stick now. On Router on Stick, we will configure Fa0/0 interface and the router virtual interfaces under this interface for Inter VLAN Routing.

  
Router (config) # interface fastEthernet 0/0
Router (config-if) # no shutdown
Router (config-if) # exit

Router (config) # interface fastEthernet 0/0.2
Router (config-if) # encapsulation dot1q 2
Router (config-if) # switchport trunk allowed vlan 2,3,4
Router (config-if) #ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.0
Router (config-if) #no shutdown
Router (config-if) #exit

Router (config) # interface fastEthernet 0/0.3
Router (config-if) # encapsulation dot1q 3
Router (config-if) # switchport trunk allowed vlan 2,3,4
Router (config-if) #ip address 20.0.0.1 255.255.255.0
Router (config-if) #no shutdown
Router (config-if) #exit

Router (config) # interface fastEthernet 0/0.4
Router (config-if) # encapsulation dot1q 4
Router (config-if) # switchport trunk allowed vlan 2,3,4
Router (config-if) #ip address 30.0.0.1 255.255.255.0
Router (config-if) #no shutdown
Router (config-if) #exit

Let’s verify our interface configurations on router, Router on Stick.

Router#show ip interface brief 
Interface              IP-Address      OK? Method Status                Protocol
 
FastEthernet0/0        unassigned      YES unset  up                    up
 
FastEthernet0/0.2      10.0.0.1        YES manual up                    up
 
FastEthernet0/0.3      20.0.0.1        YES manual up                    up
 
FastEthernet0/0.4      30.0.0.1        YES manual up                    up
 
FastEthernet0/1        unassigned      YES unset  administratively down down
 
Vlan1                  unassigned      YES unset  administratively down down

Now, it is time to verify our Router on Stick (Inter VLAN Routing) configuration. We can verify Router on Stick configuration, simply by pinging from one PC in a VLAN, to another PC in another VLANs.

Let’s do this on PC0. We will ping firstly, PC3 and then PC5.

PC>ping 20.0.0.3
Pinging 20.0.0.3 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 20.0.0.3: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=127
Reply from 20.0.0.3: bytes=32 time=0ms TTL=127
Reply from 20.0.0.3: bytes=32 time=0ms TTL=127
Reply from 20.0.0.3: bytes=32 time=0ms TTL=127
Ping statistics for 20.0.0.3:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 0ms

PC>ping 30.0.0.3
Pinging 30.0.0.3 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 30.0.0.3: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=127
Reply from 30.0.0.3: bytes=32 time=0ms TTL=127
Reply from 30.0.0.3: bytes=32 time=0ms TTL=127
Reply from 30.0.0.3: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=127
Ping statistics for 30.0.0.3:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 0ms

In this Packet Tracer configuration example, we configured Router on Stick topology. In other words, we saw Inter VLAN configuration. On Packet Tracer, we used one router, one switch and six PCs as hardware. We configured three VLANs and we assigned the interfaces to the VLANs. We also configured router interface 0/0 and create additional router virtual interfaces on this router.

Lastly, we saw that, our PCs in different VLANs can ping each other and Inter VLAN configuration is working properly in our Router on Stick topology.



************************************************************
WouLd YoU LiKe To Learn How to Use PAcket TraceR and PracTice CCNA LAbs
on PaCKet TrAcEr??? Here is My Courses on UDemY!!
CISCO PACKET TRACER HOW TO GUIDE
CISCO PACKET TRACER CCNA LABS ADVENTURE 1
CISCO PACKET TRACER CCNA LABS ADVENTURE 2
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You can DOWNLOAD the Packet Tracer example with .pkt format HERE.

You can download “Packet Tracer” in Tools section.

You can check the other Packet Tracer Examples below:

Common Cisco Router Configuration Example on Packet Tracer
Router DHCP Configuration Example on Packet Tracer
VTP Configuration Example on Packet Tracer
VLAN Configuration Example on Packet Tracer
STP Configuration Example on Packet Tracer
RSTP Configuration with Packet Tracer
STP Portfast Configuration with Packet Tracer
Inter VLAN Routing Configuration on Packet Tracer
Switch Virtual Interface (SVI) Configuration with Packet Tracer
BGP Configuration Example on Packet Tracer
Port Security Configuration Example on Packet Tracer
RIP Configuration Example on Packet Tracer
CDP Configuration Example on Packet Tracer
OSPF Area Types Example on Packet Tracer (Standard and Backbone Areas)
OSPF External Routes Example on Packet Tracer
OSPF Area Types Example on Packet Tracer (Stub, NSSA, Totally Stubby, Totally NSSA Areas)
Inter VLAN Routing Configuration on Packet Tracer
Switch Virtual Interface (SVI) Configuration with Packet Tracer
RSTP Configuration with Packet Tracer
STP Portfast Configuration with Packet Tracer

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About the Author
Gokhan Kosem is a telecommunation and network engineer. His ambition to IP networks and end-to-end system installation made him to prepare this web-site. By sharing his experiences about various networking protocols beside different system installation experiences and Cisco, Juniper, Alcatel-Lucent devices configurations, he is aimed to be helpful for his collegues in all over the world. He is currently lives in Istanbul, Turkey.

One comment for “Inter VLAN Routing Configuration on Packet Tracer (Router on Stick)”

1

I cant open the packet tracer topo in my packet tracer version 7.0.0.0306.Which is the right version of packet tracer which I can use to open user examples?

January 5th, 2017 at 01:58

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